What is a Hot Melt Adhesive?

Hot melt adhesive is commonly known as “hot glue” and is used in many applications. The major benefit of this style of adhesive is its endurance through hot or cold temperatures. This makes it perfect for handling any shipping conditions because the adhesive will not lose its bond due to temperature shifts. Hot melt adhesives are most commonly used for corrugated packaging. However, it is also good for tray formations, as a carton or case sealant and on cardboard. Hot melt adhesive will last up to three years without being used.

Home Uses
Most people use hot glue for home projects such as making wreaths or for a child’s school project. This hot melt adhesive is perfect for many uses in the home and is a reliable product for lasting adhesion. It can also be used for foam boards, fabric, plastics, metals and particle board. Think of foam board science projects or sticking patches on a shirt. Even fixing particle board furniture can be done with a hot melt adhesive.

Buying the Adhesive
Before you purchase any hot melt adhesives, consider the scope of your project. Do you need to be able to reach small places or are you using it in bulk? Hot glue comes in all shapes and sizes from tiny pellets all the way up to large cylinders. You also need the glue gun or other means of melting and dispersing the adhesive. A glue gun works by creating heat from electricity (plug it in) to melt the adhesive through the metal opening as you squeeze the trigger to disperse the glue.

Make sure the tip of the gun is the proper size for your project. You can also melt the glue on another surface and dip a toothpick, paint brush or another device into it to spread it as needed. But remember, the hot glue dries quickly! This is great because it lowers your chances of burning yourself on the hot gel during application, and it means your project is ready faster. However, it does not allow for a lot of time to adjust anything once the glue has been placed.

1 person likes this post.

Share

    Add Comment

    four × 2 =

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Shares
    Share This