The Right Materials for Deep Draw Metal Stamping Tools

Deep drawing is when you use a tool to reform a piece of metal so it becomes deeper than it is wide. Drawing is the process of stretching the material. Deep drawing can be used for many different reasons. To draw properly, you need to use the right tools. Depending on the circumstances, the right tools can vary. Typically, deep draw metal stamping tools are made of tool steel, carbon steel, or bonded carbide.

Tool Steel

Tool steel is the hardest kind of steel that is typically available. When you are trying to cut, bend, or distort metal, you have to use a tool that is harder than the material you’re trying to cut. For example, if you’re trying to cut wood, you need a metal harder than that wood. That’s why tool steel is the most common metal used for deep draw metal stamping. Tool steel is harder than most other kinds of steel, but it is also very expensive.

Carbon Steel

Carbon steel is a high carbon steel that is made with a lower quality of steel and a higher amount of carbon. This makes for a hard steel, but it’s not as hard as carbon steel. It is, however, much less expensive, which means it’s best for low-intensity uses. For example, it would be great for deep drawing copper or bronze. However, high heat or high pressure can distort the metal.

Bonded Carbide

Bonded carbide is a great deep draw metal stamping material for high pressure and high heat applications. However, it is not always very flexible or adaptable.

Deep drawing is the process of stretching metal until it reaches the shape you desire; if you are trying to choose what kind of drawing tool to use, you have to think about materials. Tool steel is the most common, carbon steel is cheaper, and carbide is a little more specialized.

Gasser & Sons provides professional Deep Draw Metal Stamping Services. They also specialize in deep drawn parts & enclosures. To learn more call 631-503-3192

Be the first to like.

Share

    Add Comment

    thirteen − nine =

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Shares
    Share This